Connect with us

Reviews

REVIEW: Dig Two Graves

Published

on

It may have been released back in 2014, but we just got around to reviewing ‘Dig Two Graves’ which tells the story of 13-year-old Jacqueline “Jake” Mather (Samantha Isler), who loses her brother in a mysterious drowning accident and is looking to get him back.

While the movie is interesting at times, it fails to hold interest for long as Jake’s run-in with three moonshiners brings the movie off the rails.

The plot intertwines the dark history of her grandfather,Sheriff Waterhouse, and his ties to the family of the 3 moonshiners, who have dark intentions with Jake.

Plot hole after plot hole, stop any momentum that this film builds in the opening 20 minutes.

One example is during Jake’s first encounter with the 3 moonshiners, who promise the return of her brother if she kills a student at her school that they have carefully selected.

During the scene, Jake first tells the strangers that “she’s not allowed to talk to strangers, but then proceeds to follow them back to their shady shack and partake in some promise ritual that involves a snake, drinking snake’s blood and painting a face with said blood.

Jake then faces the decision of whether to kill her classmate in an effort to bring her brother back, or not, and she struggles with this throughout the conclusion of the film.

All in all, the movie just has too many layers that haven’t properly been developed and/or aren’t consistently followed through with, to make things even a bit intriguing.

Fright Nerd Score
45 frights
Summary
After the shine of the premise wears off, you'll be scratching your head at the "logic" of this story.
Fright Nerd Score45

Anthony DiMoro is the leader writer and founder of 'Fright Nerd'. DiMoro has written for popular websites such as Forbes and The Huffington Post. DiMoro cites Friday the 13th, A Nightmare On Elm Street and Halloween among his favorite horror movies of all time.

News

REVIEW: Halloween Kills

Published

on

Halloween Kills

David Gordon Green returned with the second installment in his Halloween trilogy when ‘Halloween Kills’ officially arrived on Peacock and in theaters around the country, a perfect fit for the Halloween season.

But the movie, was far from perfect, or anywhere close to it.

“The nightmare isn’t over as unstoppable killer Michael Myers escapes from Laurie Strode’s trap to continue his ritual bloodbath. Injured and taken to the hospital, Laurie fights through the pain as she inspires residents of Haddonfield, Ill., to rise up against Myers. Taking matters into their own hands, the Strode women and other survivors form a vigilante mob to hunt down Michael and end his reign of terror once and for all.”

Green’s ‘Halloween’ in 2018 did plenty good at the box office, despite the movie being so-so. I wrote in my review that the movie went off the rails as soon as Myers made his return to Haddonfield, more specifically when Dr. Sartain went crazy, which I thought was a blip. However, after watching ‘Halloween Kills’ that blip turned into a number of warts that completely sent ‘Halloween Kills’ down the shitter.

Green did a marvelous job with the nostalgia of the 1978 original, as he did in the first film, with the return of Kyle Richards as Lindsey Wallace, and Tommy Doyle’s return (played by Anthony Michael Hall), but really hit it home with the returns of Dr. Loomis (CGI Donald Pleasence), Marion Chambers (Nancy Stephens) and Sheriff Leigh Brackett (Charles Cyphers) who were all pivotal characters in John Carpenter’s 1978 classic.

Aside from that, the movie was a complete dud.

Lost along the way was the essence of what made Michael Myers, and Halloween, uniquely terrifying. The plodding, stalking, slow build of Myers going after his victims was exchanged for a nothing more than a man in a mask who was capable of taking on entire gangs at once.

Myers stalking was essentially swapped out for Matrix fight scenes. And it was horribly ridiculous.

In Green’s 2018 version, Myers still had elements of his 1978 self (which was where Green’s Halloween picked up from) but were lost entirely in the 2nd entry, leaving Myers a hollow, disappointing shell of what made the character iconic.

When it was all said and done, I found myself just waiting for the movie to end, instead of bracing for how the film would lead into the 3rd and final film.

The ending was horrible, unimaginative, and simply ridiculous, which is hard for me to complain about when reviewing a slasher film.

One can hope that Green’s final entry into his version of Halloween is far superior, which will be needed to save this trilogy from being nothing more than barely memorable and easy to forget over time.

Fright Nerd Score
28.5 frights
0 Users (0 votes)
Summary
A cluster of nonsense and a disappointing departure from what made Michael Myers iconic. Green got away with some of this in 2018's film, but Halloween Kills died with his poor direction and handling of the Myers character.
Fright Nerd Score28.5
What people say... Leave your rating
Sort by:

Be the first to leave a review.

User Avatar
Verified
{{{ review.rating_title }}}
{{{review.rating_comment | nl2br}}}

Show more
{{ pageNumber+1 }}
Leave your rating

Your browser does not support images upload. Please choose a modern one

Continue Reading

News

REVIEW: ‘No Man of God’

Published

on

no man of god

Over the last couple of years there have been plenty of films centered on infamous serial killer Ted Bundy, but the latest take on the madman from director Amber Sealey and RLJE Films is quite different.

In ‘No Man of God’, Ted Bundy (Luke Kirby) and Bill Hagmaier (Elijah Wood), an FBI profiler who consistently visits Bundy on death row during the late 1980s, engage in extensive discussions that show the multiple layers of the psyche of Bundy as he fearfully approaches his fate.

Void of any of the death scenes or re-enactments of the life that Bundy led, the film focuses squarely on Hagmaier experience, and the direct interactions with Bundy, who was played wonderfully by Kirby.

A true deviation from the path that was taken in the Zac Efron starring ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile‘ and the acclaimed docu-series ‘Bundy Tapes’ that arrived on Netflix back in 2019.

The film was based on Hagmaier’s recordings and recollections of Bundy, and while it may lack the shock scenes that many may expect from a movie that is centrally focused on a brutal serial killer, it locks you in with a cerebral approach to exploring the mind of a cold-blooded killer.

Kirby’s portrayal of Bundy shows an extreme narcissism and a over-blown arrogance that is buoyed by Bundy’s hollow attempts at coming across sincere, and the projecting of the image that he is some sort of criminal mastermind.

The movie is all about tone and tension, with the apex closing in as Bundy gets closer to closer to his execution day. Things really start boiling over when Bundy’s head is shaved in preparation of his trip to the electric chair, and it continues to a satisfying end to a unique, yet solid movie that stands alone from other Bundy films.

Fright Nerd Score
78.5 frights
0 Users (0 votes)
Summary
A solid departure of what one would expect from the Bundy films that have been released in recent years. The approach, performances, and attention grip the viewer and deliver a truly unique cerebral experience throughout.
Fright Nerd Score78.5
What people say... Leave your rating
Sort by:

Be the first to leave a review.

User Avatar
Verified
{{{ review.rating_title }}}
{{{review.rating_comment | nl2br}}}

Show more
{{ pageNumber+1 }}
Leave your rating

Your browser does not support images upload. Please choose a modern one

Continue Reading

News

REVIEW: ‘Aftermath’

Published

on

aftermath

I had a chance this week to check out what all the buzz was about regarding Netflix’s new horror film ‘Aftermath’ which was directed by Peter Winther, and is currently available on the streaming platform.

Starring Ashley Greene, Shawn Ashmore, and Sharif Atkins, the based on a true story film tells the story of: “Desperate to save their marriage, a young couple takes a deal and moves into their dream home, but disturbing events reveal the house’s troubled history.”

“A young couple struggling to stay together, when they are offered an amazing deal on a home with a questionable past that would normally be beyond their means. In a final attempt to start fresh as a couple they take the deal.”

The movie starts off with a 911 call from a woman being murdered in her home, and then it cuts to the main characters Nat and Kevin, who are getting settled in the home they now can call theirs.

The film is painfully slow to start, and the slow burn that is in place to build suspense only drags on pointless scenes that fail to really push the story forward, or connect with any emotion of fear or anxiety.

Despite some “going through the motions” acting, the film labors on to a rather interesting pile of twists and turns during it’s conclusion, and it will no doubt have you Googling the real story as soon as the credits roll.

Without providing any real spoilers, if you were a fan of the reveal in ‘The Boy’, then you know what to expect during the climax of this movie. The big difference is, where ‘The Boy’ had some interesting flow, ‘Aftermath’ simply flat lines.

Fright Nerd Score
38 frights
0 Users (0 votes)
Summary
A very slow and plodding film, based on a really interesting true story, that fails to really portray any scare, horror, or suspense. Long drawn out buildups with lackluster payoffs anchor the film down, despite a solid pace towards conclusion.
Fright Nerd Score38
What people say... Leave your rating
Sort by:

Be the first to leave a review.

User Avatar
Verified
{{{ review.rating_title }}}
{{{review.rating_comment | nl2br}}}

Show more
{{ pageNumber+1 }}
Leave your rating

Your browser does not support images upload. Please choose a modern one

Continue Reading

Trending